Friday, November 9, 2012

Hudson in 1905: Part 74

The following is an excerpt from the booklet Illustrated Hudson, N.Y., published in 1905.

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF HUDSON--Capital stock $200,000. Surplus and undivided profits, $114,471.00. Individual deposits, $458, 446.09. One of the strongest and soundest banks in this city is the First National, which, since its establishment, forty-one years ago, has acquired a reputation for its good management and conservative policy. The bank gives valuable service to its customers in receiving accounts of banks, corporations, firms and individuals; according also to its customers excellent facilities for safe and expeditious transaction of their banking business. It makes call and time loans on acceptable collateral, discounts approved commercial paper, buys and sells domestic and foreign exchange; and gives special attention to the making of commercial collections. The correspondents of the First National include some of the best known financial institutions in the country. The bank solicits the accounts of merchants, manufacturers, farmers, and others, both in the city and locality adjacent, who may depend upon receiving prompt and courteous attention. The bank has recently added one of the most modern burglar-proof safes, and also a new vestibule and doors to the vault, which is now one of the finest and strongest in the State. The vault is well equipped with safe deposit boxes, which the bank officials will be glad to show anyone who may wish to secure a box at a very moderate rent. The officers are: Chas. W. Macy, President; Wm. Seymour, Vice-President; and Jordan Philip, Cashier, the latter having succeeded Alexander R. Benson, recently deceased. Besides these gentlemen, the directors are: I. N. Collier, Frederick Jessup, Frank Washburn, Jerome Walsh, Frank B. Harder, R. B. Benedict, and Edmund Rockefeller.

City Hall and Elks Theatre--Home of the First National Bank

City Hall and Elks Theatre today--Hudson Opera House  

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